August 15th, 11:24 am

USGS Volcanoes

Colleagues at the University of Hawaii have been investigating several aspects of the eruption from Kilauea's lower East Rift Zone - including research of the ocean ecosystem ocean-entry done by the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology - SOEST

www.hawaii.edu/news/2018/08/12/kilauea-eruption-ocean-microbes/

Photo of lava entering the ocean taken from the back deck of the UH research vessel Kaʻimikai-O-Kanaloa. (Photo credit: Ryan Tabata)
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August 15th, 6:45 am

USGS Volcanoes

August 14th, 1:26 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Kīlauea Volcano Status Report
Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 9:31 AM HST
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Activity and Hazards Overview

Kīlauea Volcano has remained quiet for over a week now, with no further collapse events at the summit, and, with the exception of a small, crusted-over pond of lava deep inside the fissure 8 cone and a few scattered ocean entries, no lava flowing in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Earthquake and deformation data show no net accumulation, withdrawal, or significant movement of subsurface magma or pressurization as would be expected if the system was building toward a resumption of activity.

It is too soon to tell if this change represents a temporary lull or the end of the LERZ eruption and/or summit collapse activity. In 1955, similar pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during an 88-day-long LERZ eruption. During the Mauna Ulu eruption (1969-1974), a 3.5 month pause occurred in late 1971.

Despite the eruptive pause, hazardous conditions remain in the LERZ and at the summit as described below:

● The fissure 8 crater still hosts a small amount of lava that currently does not enter the existing channel. Should the eruption rate increase, the configuration of outflow around the vent could change, sending lava in new directions. Possible flow paths to the north have been outlined in HVO’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone hazard assessment (volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-185/USGS%20Preliminary%20Analysis_LERZ_7-15-18_v1.1.pdf).

● Resupply of magma could lead to the reactivation of fissures other than fissure 8, or the opening of entirely new fissures along the ERZ, potentially leading to new areas being inundated by lava.

● The new lava flow field in the LERZ includes large areas of still-hot, rugged, and unstable lava surfaces that are subject to collapse.

● Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions have greatly decreased from LERZ vents, but high levels of SO2 may persist in downwind areas.

● Tephra (fragments of glassy lava) have accumulated to thicknesses of more than several feet near fissure 8. This material breaks down over time into small, glassy particles that can be blown on the wind and create an eye, respiratory, and skin irritant. Disturbing the tephra by sweeping, shoveling, or driving over it will break the fragile pieces into a glassy dust. The tephra can also conceal underlying hazards such as ground cracks, holes, and debris from destroyed structures.

● The LERZ ocean entry is minimally active at this time, but continued laze and lava delta collapses remain a concern. Hydrovolcanic explosions are much less of a concern now, as they require high eruption rates with lava entering the ocean, but they may still occur.

● At the summit, additional earthquakes, rockfalls, and ground cracking can occur with no warning. Steep crater walls destabilized by months of earthquakes could be prone to collapse for weeks or months to come, even without further ground shaking (volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-184/Summit%20scenarios_7-5-18.pdf).

● Summit SO2 emissions rates are lower than at any time since late 2007 and are not currently a hazard.

● Resuspended ash in the summit region remains a local hazard during strong winds.

● As the summit continues to adjust to changes in the underlying magmatic system, additional, and potentially damaging, earthquakes are possible. Hawai’i is known for frequent earthquakes, so all residents should be prepared for damaging earthquakes.

● If magma returns to the shallow reservoir beneath Kilauea’s summit, groundwater could encounter subsurface regions of high temperature, prompting explosions of uncertain size.

● More dangerous explosive activity at the summit remains very unlikely in the near term. For more information, see volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-184/Summit%20scenarios_7-5-18.pdf

● Aftershocks from the May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake below Kilauea’s south flank will continue for months more and could produce moderate, damaging events at any time.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to closely monitor Kīlauea’s activity, including overflights of the rift zone and summit as needed, supplemented with unmanned aerial systems (UAS) flights and daily visual observations. Field crews will be deployed to the LERZ and the summit areas to collect data and to install and repair monitoring instruments. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.
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August 14th, 3:58 am

USGS Volcanoes

August 13th, 2:47 pm

USGS Volcanoes

#HVO #Kīlauea Status update for Monday, August 13 (12:48PM HST)
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone (LERZ)

The lull in eruptive activity on the LERZ continues. A gas plume billows from the Fissure 8 cone and a small lava pond is circulating sluggishly within its confines. The only "red" lava visible on the flow field itself is that oozing into the ocean between the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui area coastline. Fresh black sand, created as molten lava is chilled and shattered by the surf, is being transported to the SW by longshore currents and accumulating in the Pohoiki small boat harbor, which is now blocked by a sandbar. The western most ocean entry is about 1 km from the harbor.

It is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to return with renewed vigor days or weeks later. Resumption of the activity on the LERZ could occur at any time, and residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Gas Emissions

SO2 emissions from the summit, Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō , and the Lower East Rift Zone are all at low levels. LERZ emissions on August 5-6 were ~ 200 tons/day; Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō emissions on August 6-7 were 200-300 tons/day, and Summit emissions when last measured on July 19 were around 100 tons/day. This SO2 release represents the lowest SO2 emitted from Kīlauea for over a decade.

Despite the low emission rates, SO2 plumes were blown toward populated areas in east Hawai'i by SE winds on August 9, and many individuals reported detecting the smell of sulfur. Weather conditions contributed to this, but in addition, as the eruption vents cool down, small amounts of H2S are generated. The human nose can detect H2S at very low levels, adding to the overall perception of increased sulfur emission.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

Summit seismicity continues to be low, with only 3 locatable earthquakes occurring per hour (maximum magnitude of M2.1). Summit deflation is negligible.

HVO will continue to monitor Kīlauea closely for any signs of change in activity.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.
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August 13th, 4:00 am

USGS Volcanoes

Are gas emissions at Yellowstone dangerous? You may ask this question while walking along the boardwalks of Yellowstone's geyser basins, where you'll see billowing white gas plumes or wrinkle your nose at a stinky "rotten egg" smell. In fact, it's a question that has been considered by scientists and visitors to the area for over a century.

Learn all about the potential hazards of gases at Yellowstone in this week's #Yellowstone #CalderaChronicles.

volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/yellowstone/article_home.html

(Photo: A grizzly bear that succumbed to exposure to gas emissions in "Death Gulch" in 1897.)
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August 12th, 3:26 pm

USGS Volcanoes

#HVO #Kilauea Status Update for Sunday, August 12 (12:05PM HST)
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone (LERZ)

The lull in eruptive activity on the LERZ continues. A gas plume billows from Fissure 8, but the only "red" lava visible on the flow field is that oozing into the ocean between the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui area coastline. Fresh black sand, created as molten lava is chilled and shattered by the surf, is being transported to the SW by longshore currents and accumulating in the Pohoiki small boat harbor.

It is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to return with renewed vigor days or weeks later. Resumption of the activity on the LERZ could occur at any time, and residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Gas Emissions

SO2 emissions from the summit, Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō , and the Lower East Rift Zone are all at low levels. LERZ emissions on August 5-6 were ~ 200 tons/day; Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō emissions on August 6-7 were 200-300 tons/day, and Summit emissions when last measured on July 19 were around 100 tons/day. This SO2 release represents the lowest SO2 emitted from Kīlauea for over a decade.

Despite the low emission rates, SO2 plumes were blown toward populated areas in east Hawai'i by SE winds on August 9, and many individuals reported detecting the smell of sulfur. Weather conditions contributed to this, but in addition, as the eruption vents cool down, small amounts of H2S are generated. The human nose can detect H2S at very low levels, adding to the overall perception of increased sulfur emission.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

Summit seismicity continues to be low, with only 1-2 locatable earthquakes occurring per hour (maximum magnitude of M2.2). Summit deflation is negligible.

HVO will continue to monitor Kīlauea closely for any signs of change in activity.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.
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August 12th, 5:32 am

USGS Volcanoes

We are having technical issues with the #Kilauea summit live webcam located at #HVO. However, the one located on the Northeast rim works fine (watch the sunrise now!). We're working on the issue.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgtexHFz9Jw
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August 12th, 5:28 am

USGS Volcanoes

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Saturday, August 11. Residual lava in the Fissure 8 flow continues to drain, feeding numerous small ocean entries (shown in main map). In the Fissure 8 cone there were two small lava ponds (shown in small inset map). The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

#volcanoes #usgs #thermalmap #KilaueaEruption #LERZ #HVO #HawaiianVolcanoObservatory
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August 11th, 1:05 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Kīlauea Volcano Status Report
Saturday, August 11, 2018, 10:07 AM HST
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html
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Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone
During an overflight of the LERZ this morning (August 11) two small ponds of lava were observed in the Fissure 8 cone. One pond is crusted over and stagnant, the other is incandescent and sluggishly convecting. A gas plume billows up from Fissure 8; low-level steaming from a handful of the other fissures (inactive) is intermittent. Lava is oozing at several points along the coastline creating wispy laze plumes. Black sand is generating a temporary beach at the Pohoiki boat ramp.
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Kīlauea Volcano Summit
It has been over a week since the most recent collapse event at the summit on August 2. Summit seismicity continues to be low, with only 2-3 located earthquakes occurring per hour (maximum magnitude of M2.0). Summit deflation is negligible.
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Although the lull in LERZ activity continues, it is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to return with renewed vigor days or weeks later, or longer. Resumption of the activity on the LERZ could occur at any time, and residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 10th, 6:12 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Since August 4, 2018, Kīlauea Volcano’s summit activity has diminished dramatically. But between mid-May and early August, 62 collapse events occurred, with each releasing energy equivalent to a magnitude-5+ earthquake and causing extensive ground shaking in the summit area.

On July 5, 2018, USGS video cameras stationed at various summit locations happened to record one of the collapse events. The first clip shows the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory entrance sign rattling in response to ground shaking. The second clip shows dramatic movement along the rock wall and a ground crack at the Jaggar Museum Overlook in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park—visual reminders of hazards associated with the collapses. Some of the audio is wind noise, but the roar of rocks falling from steep crater walls within Halema‘uma‘u can also be heard as dust rises from Kīlauea caldera.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 10th, 6:00 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Kīlauea Volcano Status Report
Friday, August 10, 2018, 1:17 PM HST
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html
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Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone
A small lava pond remains in the Fissure 8 cone. Observations yesterday (August 9) show the pond to be largely crusted over with only minor areas of incandescence. Fissure 8, and the channel leading from Fissure 8, show no sign of reactivation. Fissures 9, 10, and 24 up-rift of fissure 8, and the down-rift fissures 13, 23, 3, 21 and 7 continue to steam, but are not incandescent. Lava is oozing at several points along the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui coastline creating wispy laze plumes.
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Kīlauea Volcano Summit
It has been over a week since the most recent collapse event at the summit on August 2. Summit seismicity continues to be low over the last 24 hours, with less than 5 located earthquakes per hour and a maximum magnitude of M2.0. Summit deflation is negligible.
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Sulfur Dioxide Emissions (SO2)
SO2 emissions from the summit, Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō (middle East Rift Zone), and the lower East Rift Zone are all at low levels. LERZ emissions on August 5-6 were ~ 200 tons/day; Pu῾u ῾Ō῾ō emissions on August 6-7 were 200-300 tons/day, and summit emissions when last measured on July 19 were around 100 tons/day. This SO2 release represents the lowest SO2 emitted from Kīlauea for over a decade.

Despite the low emission rates, SO2 plumes were blown toward populated areas in east Hawai'i by SE winds on August 9, and many individuals reported detecting the smell of sulfur. Weather conditions contributed to this, but in addition, as the eruption vents cool down, small amounts of H2S are generated. The human nose can detect H2S at very low levels, adding to the overall perception of increased sulfur emission.

Although the lull in LERZ activity continues, it is common for eruptions to go through periods of diminished output, or to pause completely, only to return with renewed vigor days or weeks later, or longer. Resumption of the activity on the LERZ could occur at any time, and residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Image taken August 10, 2018, by the UAS Team (Unmanned Aircraft Systems). UAS flew over fissure 8 today, providing this aerial view into the cinder cone. The pond of lava within the vent has receded and is about 40 m (130 ft) below the highest point on the cinder cone's rim.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 10th, 11:10 am

USGS Volcanoes

All volcanoes in the Cascade Range of Washington and Oregon are at normal background levels of activity this week.
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN
Weekly Update: on.doi.gov/2hwAiRm

Recent Observations: A few small earthquakes were located at Mount St. Helens, Mount Rainier, and Mount Hood. Such activity is normal. A possible debris-flow event occurred on the West Fork White River in the late afternoon-evening of August 4th, as indicated by seismic signals reported by Mount Rainier National Park staff on the 4th and elevated sediment levels reported downstream by Puyallup Tribe Fisheries scientists on the morning of August 5. No damage was reported.

This USGS image, taken July 31, 2018, by Jessica Bersson, shows USGS scientist Alexa Van Eaton examining pumice at an outcrop near Glacier Peak. Glacier Peak is not prominently visible from any major population center, and so its attractions, as well as its hazards, tend to be overlooked. Studying deposits from previous eruptions (Glacier Peak has erupted multiple times during at least six separate episodes since the end of the most recent ice age) aids in understanding more about this volcano and its hazards.

#usgs #cvo #cascadesvolcanoobservatory #volcanoupdate
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August 10th, 7:38 am

USGS Volcanoes

In 1955, Kīlauea Volcano erupted on the lower East Rift Zone. The eruption lasted for 88 days. Aspects of the eruption were filmed by sugar cane company officials, who, in order to collect fire insurance, needed to prove that the cane had burned. They captured video of spatter cones in orchards, steaming cracks in the road, lava fountains and an ocean entry.

An archivist at the Lyman Museum and Mission House in Hilo (lymanmuseum.org/) discovered several reels of old film footage in storage, and sent these to Honolulu to be digitized. The video, posted in 2014, includes two film reel segments, one with narration and one without audio. The reels are presented back-to-back within this hour-long video, available at youtu.be/DN9pdJyGhuo.

Read more about Kīlauea Volcano’s eruptive past on the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webpage, at volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/geo_hist_1955.html

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 10th, 4:49 am

USGS Volcanoes

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Thursday, August 9. Residual lava in the Fissure 8 flow continues to drain, feeding numerous small ocean entries (shown in main map). In the Fissure 8 cone there was a small, mostly crusted, lava pond (shown in small inset map). The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

More maps: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

#volcanoes #usgs #LERZ #fissure8 #KilaueaEruption #KilaueaErupts #map
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August 9th, 5:38 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Is Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and rift zone activity pau (over) or paused (taking a break)?

Here’s the situation as of August 9:

At Kīlauea’s summit, earthquake counts—which were 30–40 per hour in prior weeks—have decreased to as few as 1–2 per hour. A collapse event has not occurred since August 2, and no significant subsidence has been evident since August 4.
On the volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, the eruption of lava and emission of sulfur dioxide gas (SO2) have decreased dramatically. Only a small pond of crusted lava remains deep within the fissure 8 cone and the lava channel is mostly empty. The ocean entry is minimally active, with small streams of lava oozing into the ocean, mostly near Isaac Hale Beach Park, and the laze plume is diminished.

Why the LERZ eruption and summit subsidence abated so quickly is not certain, but one possibility is that it could be a response to reduced magma supply to the LERZ as the summit reservoir progressively emptied. It might also reflect a blockage within the magma system between the summit and the LERZ; however, the lack of seismicity and deformation, which generally indicate pressurization associated with a blockage, suggest that this is perhaps unlikely. Other possibilities also exist.

The significance of these changes is not clear. It’s possible that the slowdown is just a pause, and that an eruption on the East Rift Zone and subsidence at the summit of Kīlauea could resume. In 1955, two pauses of 5 and 16 days occurred during that 88-day-long LERZ eruption.

It’s also possible that the slowdown reflects the end of the LERZ eruption and summit subsidence. But it will take days, or possibly weeks, to determine with certainty if the activity is pau or merely paused.

Read on, in the latest edition of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s Volcano Watch, at volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html?vwid=1377.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 9th, 2:15 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Although activity and lava output from fissure 8 in Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone remains low, the ocean entry is still active. Numerous small ooze out streams and weak plumes were observed near Ahalanui during a helicopter overflight on August 9, 2018. The southern portion of the flow margin remains close to the Pohoiki boat ramp, but has not appreciably advanced. Lava continues to enter the ocean along the northern Kapoho lobes.

#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption
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August 9th, 10:41 am

USGS Volcanoes

Kīlauea Volcano Status Report
Thursday, August 9, 2018, 9:06 AM HST
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Lower East Rift Zone

Activity and lava output from Fissure 8 remains low and there have been no signs of reactivation or new intrusion. Up-rift of Fissure 8, Fissures 9, 10, and 24, and down-rift Fissures 13, 23, 3, 21 and 7, continue to steam. Ground crews and overflights continue to monitor these for signs of new activity. This morning's overflight crew observed a crusted lava pond deep inside the steaming cone at a level significantly lower than when viewed Tuesday morning.

The significance of this change is not yet clear and hazardous conditions remain in the area. HVO field crews and the UAS team will monitor activity throughout the day and overnight.

It is common for eruptions to wax and wane or pause completely. A return to high levels of lava discharge or new outbreaks in the area of active fissures could occur at any time.

Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

---------------------
Middle East Rift Zone

Gas measurements of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō plume taken on August 6 and 7 indicated a reduced SO2 emission rate lower than the August 3 measurement and similar to what has been observed over the past three months. No active lava was observed in the crater on an overflight on August 6th. This morning, the steam plume appears wispy and intermittent.

A magnitude-4.4 earthquake occurred southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō this morning at 6:50 a.m. The earthquake had no significant effect on the status of Kīlauea activity except to generate a brief dust plume from Puʻu ʻŌʻō several minutes later.

----------------------
Summit

The volcano's summit remains quiet, except for the small occasional rockfall, following the most recent collapse at 11:55 a.m. HST August 2nd. This continues a significant departure from the pattern of seismicity and deformation over the past several months, with very low rates of seismicity continuing today. Except for a very gradual deflation, the deformation at the summit as measured by tiltmeter and GPS instruments has stopped.

Summit and LERZ changes considered together imply that the rate of magma leaving the summit to feed the lower East Rift Zone eruption has significantly decreased. How long this condition will persist is unknown. It is possible that outflow will pick up again, resulting in renewed summit area deflation leading to another collapse event and renewed eruption vigor on the LERZ.

HVO will continue to monitor Kīlauea closely for any signs of change in activity.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

#KilaueaEruption #KilaueaErupts #Kilauea #volcano #volcanoes #usgs #LERZ #KilaueaSummit
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August 8th, 2:17 pm

USGS Volcanoes

With a hurricane traveling south of Hawai’i today, field observations in the lower East Rift Zone were limited to a couple hours of observations from the ground. Activity and lava output from fissure 8 remains low.

The significance of this change is not yet clear and hazardous conditions remain in the area. HVO field crews and the UAS team will monitor activity throughout the day and overnight.

It is common for eruptions to wax and wane or pause completely. A return to high levels of lava discharge or new outbreaks in the area of active fissures could occur at any time.

#kilauea #kilaueaeruption #fissure8
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August 7th, 2:10 pm

USGS Volcanoes

Here is today's #HVO update of #Kīlauea Volcano's Lower East Rift Zone (1:06 PM HST): volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

Activity and lava output from fissure 8 remains low. The morning overflight crew observed a small active lava lake within the fissure 8 cone, a weak gas plume, and a drained upper lava channel. The surface of the lava lake was about 5-10 m below the spillway entrance. There were a diminishing number of small active ooze outs near the coast on the Kapoho Bay and Ahalanui lobes and the laze plume was greatly diminished. Active lava remains close to the Pohoiki boat ramp but has not advanced significantly toward it.

The significance of this change is not yet clear and hazardous conditions remain in the area. HVO field crews and the UAS team will monitor activity throughout the day and overnight.

It is common for eruptions to wax and wane or pause completely. A return to high levels of lava discharge or new outbreaks in the area of active fissures could occur at any time.

Residents should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Summit and LERZ changes considered together imply that the rate of magma leaving the summit to feed the Lower East Rift Zone eruption has decreased. How long this condition will persist is unknown. It is possible that outflow will pick up again, resulting in renewed summit area deflation leading to another collapse event and renewed eruption vigor on the LERZ.

HVO will continue to monitor Kīlauea closely for any signs of change in activity.

The next status report will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

MORE INFORMATION

Subscribe to these messages: volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

CONTACT INFORMATION:

[email protected]

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.
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